Elephants, where are they? Draw a Map of Endangered Animals

Every elephant counts!

On the Fifth of May, we saved

Five Trumpeting Elephants

But where are they?

The magnificent elephants migrate and cross borders. Elephants have no passports like humans and it vital to count the numbers and see where they are to help protect them.

To help protect elephants in Africa “The Great Elephant Census” was carried out. So our idea for this month involved making a map. There are many advantages with borders and many reasons behind borders. But borders can be a disadvantage as well. This is a perfect way to explore this topic.
Why not make a giant elephant map?
You can use this map as inspiration.
Make it a pretty make and draw some stunning elephants using this idea. I love Carla Sonheim’s creative approach to drawing. Check out these blog posts where she also provided inspiration. Her book
Drawing and Painting Imaginary Animals: A Mixed-Media Workshop with Carla Sonheim is a real treat.
We used old newspaper to make the map. We did not draw any countries or write their names on the map to highlight the idea that elephants cross borders and also that we all have to work across borders to save endangered animals.

The updated mind map.

Sparking Children’s Thinkibility Film Tips

Naledi, means “Star” in Setswana (one of the Bantu language groups, mostly spoken in Botswana, South Africa and Namibia). The baby elephant was born on a starry summer night in 2013. She was orphaned just a couple of weeks later and she struggled to survive without her mother’s milk. Naledi’s struggle for survival is a touching story. Across Africa, elephants are facing challenges every day and these magnificent creatures are fighting for their survival. Every year around 30, 000 elephants are killed by poachers.

Watch Naledi: A Baby Elephant’s Tale, on Netflix

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